Thursday, May 17, 2012

Chive Blossom Vinegar

Pin It Now!
Chive blossoms fresh from the garden
Chive blossoms fresh from the garden

I was blessed this year on Mother's Day.  I got to spend the entire day, not just one meal, with all of my children.  My oldest kids stuck around the whole day and the weather was not only clear and sunny but also warm.  The house was a quiet hum of cooking, talking, laughing, chores, and spending time together.  This was exactly what I needed after spending all of Saturday going through my Father's and Grandmother's belongings that are now mine, trying to find a place for it all in my home and in my heart.  I want them both back and here with me and their things don't fill that need.  Sometimes it just feels like it makes the ache worse, not better.


My family knows how much I love flowers and I received some from all my kids.  A potted tulip that I will transfer to the front flower bed, a dozen cut beautiful roses, and 2 hanging baskets that are bursting with flowers and vines and brighten up the deck.  I even got a bright pink potted flowering succulent from Dodi (not a daughter, but her and her husband are considered a part of our family) with a fantastic message and warm hug.

Blossoms with stems removed
Blossoms with stems removed

What does any of this have to do with chive blossom vinegar?  Lots, actually.  Peter also got me some flowers, but his were handpicked from his garden with pride and presented in a small juice glass with a bit of water.  Chive blossoms.  I have been excited about his garden all spring and I am very lucky to get the first crop so far, these beautiful purple blooms.

Chive blossom vinegar 1 day old
Chive blossom vinegar 1 day old

There really isn't much of a recipe for this vinegar.  Use a jar that is sized to match the amount of blossoms you get so that it is about 2/3 full. If you have a ton of them, use a quart or even half gallon jar, and work your way down in size for whatever fits best.  Top the jar with white vinegar, rice vinegar, or white wine vinegar and let it steep for 2 weeks someplace cool and dark.  After 2 weeks strain your chive blossom vinegar and store it in a clean jar of your choice.  Enjoy this vinegar in salad dressings, in your favorite bruschetta topping, to add a splash of acidity to seafood dishes, just to name a few ways.  I have marked my calendar and I will post an updated photo for you in 2 weeks so you can see the end results.  The color of this vinegar is amazing when it is done.




Chive Blossom Vinegar
Turn those purple blooms into a wonderful vinegar that is brightly colored after steeping for 2 weeks.
Ingredients
  • as much as needed to fill the jar white vinegar
  • enough to fill the jar 2/3 full chive blossoms, stem removed
Instructions

  1. Snip off the stem portion of your chive blossoms so just the purple tufts are left. Wash well and let air dry or use a salad spinner to dry.
  2. Fill your jar 2/3 full with the clean blossoms. Top with any clear vinegar of your choice like white vinegar, rice vinegar, white wine vinegar. Cover and let the vinegar steep for 2 weeks in a cool dark place.
  3. After 2 weeks, strain your vinegar to remove all chive bits and store in a clean jar of your choice. Use in salad dressings, on top of seafood, on fries, all kinds of great ways. Enjoy!
Details
Prep time: Cook time: Total time: Yield: 1 jar

Seasonal Eats Badge